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Rasagiline

Rasagiline Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

RASAGILINE (ra SA ji leen) is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). It is used to treat Parkinson's disease.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • high or low blood pressure

  • history of stroke

  • liver disease

  • skin cancer

  • taken an MAOI like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, or Parnate in last 14 days

  • taking any of the following medicines: cyclobenzaprine, dextromethorphan, meperidine, methadone, propoxyphene, St. John's Wort, or tramadol

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to rasagiline, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cyclobenzaprine

  • dextromethorphan

  • linezolid

  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

  • medicines for depression

  • meperidine

  • methadone

  • propoxyphene

  • St. John's Wort

  • tramadol

  • tryptophan

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amiodarone

  • anagrelide

  • antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin

  • buspirone

  • carbamazepine

  • cimetidine

  • diphenoxylate

  • female hormones, like estrogens

  • furazolidone

  • isoniazid

  • kava kava

  • levodopa

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for cold or congestion like pseudoephedrine

  • medicines for anxiety or psychotic disturbances

  • medicines for sleep during surgery

  • mexiletine

  • narcotic medicines for pain

  • procarbazine

  • SAM-e

  • stimulant medicines for attention, focus, or weight loss

  • tacrine

  • theophylline

  • tizanidine

  • valerian

  • yohimbine

  • zileuton

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Even after you stop taking this medicine the effects can last for two weeks or more.

This medicine may increase your risk of getting skin cancer. Report any irregular moles, dark or white spots, or sores that do not heal. Have your skin checked for skin cancer regularly.

This medicine can interact with certain foods that contain high amounts of tyramine. The combination may cause severe headaches, a rise in blood pressure, or irregular heart beat. Foods that contain significant amounts of tyramine include aged cheeses, meats and fish (especially aged, smoked, pickled, or processed such as bologna, pepperoni, salami, summer sausage), beer and ale, alcohol-free beer, wine (especially red), sherry, hard liquor, liqueurs, avocados, bananas, figs, raisins, soy sauce, miso soup, yeast/protein extracts, bean curd, fava or broad bean pods, or any over-ripe fruit. Ask your doctor or health care professional, pharmacist, or nutritionist for a complete listing of tyramine-containing foods.

Talk to your doctor if you are taking, or are planning to take, any prescription or over-the-counter drugs, especially antidepressants and over-the-counter cold medications. Some medicines may interact with this medicine and could cause you adverse effects.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. This medicine can interact with other medicines used during surgery.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • confusion

  • hallucination, loss of contact with reality

  • high blood pressure

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • fever

  • memory loss

  • muscle or neck stiffness or spasm

  • problems with balance, talking, or walking

  • seizures

  • sudden severe headache

  • suicidal thoughts or other mood changes

  • unexplained nausea or vomiting

  • unusual sweating

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • dry mouth

  • loss of appetite

  • stomach pain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


 
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