Go

Health Library

Metoclopramide

Metoclopramide Hydrochloride Oral disintegrating tablet

What is this medicine?

METOCLOPRAMIDE (met oh kloe PRA mide) is used to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) like heartburn. It is also used to relieve the symptoms of slow stomach emptying in people with diabetes.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • breast cancer

  • depression or other mental illness

  • diabetes

  • heart failure or heart rhythm problems

  • high blood pressure

  • if you often drink alcohol

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • Parkinson's disease or a movement disorder

  • pheochromocytoma

  • seizures

  • stomach obstruction, bleeding, or perforation

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to metoclopramide, sulfites, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine at least 30 minutes before eating and at bedtime. Leave the tablet in the sealed blister pack until you are ready to take it. With dry hands, open the blister and gently remove the tablet. If the tablet breaks or crumbles, throw it away and take a new tablet out of the blister pack. Place the tablet in the mouth and allow it to dissolve, and then swallow. You do not need water to take this medicine. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you've taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • acetaminophen

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for diabetes, including insulin

  • medicines for hay fever and other allergies

  • medicines for depression, especially an Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI)

  • medicines for Parkinson's disease, like levodopa

  • medicines for sleep or for pain

  • tetracycline

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

It may take a few weeks for your condition to improve. Do not take this medicine for longer than 12 weeks. The longer you take this medicine and the more that you take, the more likely you are to have side effects. If you are an older patient, a female, or you have diabetes, you may be at increased risk for side effects. Contact your health care professional right away if you have movements that you cannot control such as lip smacking, rapid movements of the tongue, unusual movements of the eyes, head, or arms.

Patients and their families should watch out for worsening depression or thoughts of suicide. Also watch out for sudden changes in feelings such as feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, overly excited and hyperactive, or not being able to sleep. If this happens, especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose, call your health care professional.

Do not treat yourself for high fever. Ask your health care professional for advice.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • abnormal production of milk in females

  • breast enlargement in both males and females

  • change in the way you walk

  • difficulty moving, speaking, or swallowing

  • drooling, lip smacking, or rapid movements of the tongue

  • excessive sweating

  • fever

  • involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs

  • irregular heartbeat or palpitations

  • muscle twitches and spasms

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (Report these to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome.):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • depressed mood

  • diarrhea

  • difficulty sleeping

  • headache

  • menstrual changes

  • restless or nervous

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.


Metoclopramide Hydrochloride Oral solution

What is this medicine?

METOCLOPRAMIDE (met oh kloe PRA mide) is used to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) like heartburn. It is also used to treat people with slow emptying of the stomach and intestinal tract.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • breast cancer

  • depression

  • diabetes

  • heart failure

  • high blood pressure

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • Parkinson's disease or a movement disorder

  • pheochromocytoma

  • seizures

  • stomach obstruction, bleeding, or perforation

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to metoclopramide, procainamide, sulfites, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Use a specially marked spoon or container to measure each dose. Ask your pharmacist if you do not have one. Household spoons are not accurate. Take this medicine on an empty stomach, about 30 minutes before eating. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • acetaminophen

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for diabetes, including insulin

  • medicines for hay fever and other allergies

  • medicines for depression, especially an Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI)

  • medicines for Parkinson's disease, like levodopa

  • medicines for sleep or for pain

  • tetracycline

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

It may take a few weeks for your stomach condition to start to get better. However, do not take this medicine for longer than 12 weeks. The longer you take this medicine, and the more you take it, the greater your chances are of developing serious side effects. If you are an elderly patient, a female patient, or you have diabetes, you may be at an increased risk for side effects from this medicine. Contact your doctor immediately if you start having movements you cannot control such as lip smacking, rapid movements of the tongue, involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs, or muscle twitches and spasms.

Patients and their families should watch out for worsening depression or thoughts of suicide. Also watch out for any sudden or severe changes in feelings such as feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, overly excited and hyperactive, or not being able to sleep. If this happens, especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose, call your doctor.

Do not treat yourself for high fever. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • abnormal production of milk in females

  • breast enlargement in both males and females

  • change in the way you walk

  • difficulty moving, speaking or swallowing

  • drooling, lip smacking, or rapid movements of the tongue

  • excessive sweating

  • fever

  • involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs

  • irregular heartbeat or palpitations

  • muscle twitches and spasms

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • depressed mood

  • diarrhea

  • difficulty sleeping

  • headache

  • menstrual changes

  • restless or nervous

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Do not freeze. Protect from light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Metoclopramide Hydrochloride Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

METOCLOPRAMIDE (met oh kloe PRA mide) is used to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) like heartburn. It is also used to treat people with slow emptying of the stomach and intestinal tract.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • breast cancer

  • depression

  • diabetes

  • heart failure

  • high blood pressure

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • Parkinson's disease or a movement disorder

  • pheochromocytoma

  • seizures

  • stomach obstruction, bleeding, or perforation

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to metoclopramide, procainamide, sulfites, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine on an empty stomach, about 30 minutes before eating. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on the advice of your doctor or health care professional.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • acetaminophen

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for diabetes, including insulin

  • medicines for hay fever and other allergies

  • medicines for depression, especially an Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI)

  • medicines for Parkinson's disease, like levodopa

  • medicines for sleep or for pain

  • tetracycline

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

It may take a few weeks for your stomach condition to start to get better. However, do not take this medicine for longer than 12 weeks. The longer you take this medicine, and the more you take it, the greater your chances are of developing serious side effects. If you are an elderly patient, a female patient, or you have diabetes, you may be at an increased risk for side effects from this medicine. Contact your doctor immediately if you start having movements you cannot control such as lip smacking, rapid movements of the tongue, involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs, or muscle twitches and spasms.

Patients and their families should watch out for worsening depression or thoughts of suicide. Also watch out for any sudden or severe changes in feelings such as feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, overly excited and hyperactive, or not being able to sleep. If this happens, especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose, call your doctor.

Do not treat yourself for high fever. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • abnormal production of milk in females

  • breast enlargement in both males and females

  • change in the way you walk

  • difficulty moving, speaking or swallowing

  • drooling, lip smacking, or rapid movements of the tongue

  • excessive sweating

  • fever

  • involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs

  • irregular heartbeat or palpitations

  • muscle twitches and spasms

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • depressed mood

  • diarrhea

  • difficulty sleeping

  • headache

  • menstrual changes

  • restless or nervous

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Metoclopramide Hydrochloride Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

METOCLOPRAMIDE (met oh kloe PRA mide) is used to treat people with slow emptying of the stomach and intestinal tract. It may be used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer treatment or surgery. This medicine may also be used before certain stomach exams or procedures.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • breast cancer

  • depression

  • diabetes

  • heart failure

  • high blood pressure

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • Parkinson's disease or a movement disorder

  • pheochromocytoma

  • seizures

  • stomach obstruction, bleeding, or perforation

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to metoclopramide, procainamide, sulfites, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection into a muscle or for infusion into a vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • acetaminophen

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for depression, especially an Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor (MAOI)

  • medicines for diabetes, including insulin

  • medicines for hay fever and other allergies

  • medicines for Parkinson's disease, like levodopa

  • medicines for sleep or for pain

  • tetracycline

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

It may take a few weeks for your stomach condition to get better. However, do not take this medicine for longer than 12 weeks. The longer you take this medicine, and the more you take it, the greater your chances are of developing serious side effects. If you are an elderly patient, a female patient, or you have diabetes, you may be at an increased risk for side effects from this medicine. Contact your doctor immediately if you start having movements you cannot control such as lip smacking, rapid movements of the tongue, involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs, or muscle twitches and spasms.

Patients and their families should watch out for worsening depression or thoughts of suicide. Also watch out for any sudden or severe changes in feelings such as feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, overly excited and hyperactive, or not being able to sleep. If this happens, especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose, call your doctor.

Do not treat yourself for high fever. Ask your doctor or health care professional for advice.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this drug affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol can make you more drowsy and dizzy. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • abnormal production of milk in females

  • breast enlargement in both males and females

  • change in the way you walk

  • difficulty moving, speaking or swallowing

  • drooling, lip smacking, or rapid movements of the tongue

  • excessive sweating

  • fever

  • involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, head, arms and legs

  • irregular heartbeat or palpitations

  • muscle twitches and spasms

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • change in sex drive or performance

  • depressed mood

  • diarrhea

  • difficulty sleeping

  • headache

  • menstrual changes

  • restless or nervous

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.


 
Health Library

Sign Up Today for Free e-Newsletters

Find a doctor or make an appointment:
General Information: (314) 747-3000
One Barnes-Jewish Hospital Plaza
St. Louis, MO 63110
© Copyright 1997-2014, Barnes-Jewish Hospital. All Rights Reserved.