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Heart & Vascular Center

Artificial Heart Devices

The cardiac surgeons at the Barnes-Jewish & Washington University Heart & Vascular Center are one of the leading heart surgery teams in the nation. Our permanent and temporary artificial heart devices can dramatically improve symptoms of late-stage heart failure, and sometimes even provide long-term treatment.

Mechanical Circulatory Support

The field of mechanical circulatory support in the management of patients with heart failure has seen significant advances over the past few years.  The heart failure program at Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Hospital utilizes the latest technology for both temporary and long-term mechanical support of the heart failure patient.

Temporary Support

Patients that experience severe symptoms of heart failure that cannot be stabilized with medical therapy may require a temporary support device. These implantable devices are usually placed in a cardiac catheterization lab by interventional cardiologists and/or cardiac surgeons. Temporary support devices typically serve to stabilize the patient until long-term mechanical support can be introduced. These devices include:

  • intra-aortic balloon pump
  • Impella 2.5, 4.0 and 5.0
  • TandemHeart
  • Thoratec CentriMag

Long-Term Mechanical Support

Patients may require long-term circulatory support either as a bridge to a heart transplant (bridge-to-transplant, or BTT) or as long-term treatment of heart failure in non-transplant candidates (destination therapy, or DT).  The mechanical assist device program at Barnes-Jewish & Washington University Heart & Vascular Center is one of the largest programs in the country. The program has a multidisciplinary group of dedicated specialists to ensure excellent outcomes in this patient population. Currently available devices include both left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) and the total artificial heart:

  • HeartMate II
  • HeartWare HVAD
  • Syncardia Total Artificial Heart

To make an appointment with a Washington University heart or vascular specialist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, call .

Megan Moss Radio Ad

At age 23, Megan Moss was too young to die. Diagnosed with myocarditis, her disease fell into heart failure. An innovative device was implanted until a donor heart became available for transplant. Now Megan is back to work and living the life of a normal 25 year old. Listen to her story here.

 

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