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Epilepsy Center

Epilepsy Surgery

Neurosurgeons at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center perforn more epilepsy surgeries than at any other center in the region. We offer a full range of options for the treatment of epilepsy, including monitoring with implanted electrodes, resective surgery and vagus nerve stimulation. New operations and advances such as Gamma Knife surgeries allow patients to gain control over seizures with minimal disruption of normal brain function. And less invasive surgical techniques developed by our neurosurgeons are enabling pinpoint accuracy when specific brain structures are involved.

Safer Surgery for Life-Changing Results

As leaders in epilepsy treatment, Barnes-Jewish and Washington University neurosurgeons offer safer surgery for life-changing relief from seizures. Because of the thorough evaluation done before surgery, neurosurgeons are able to pinpoint the area of brain affected and avoid other areas that control critical motor, language and memory function. Epilepsy surgery has become extremely safe, with a rate of serious complications of less than one percent.

More Options for Better Seizure Control

Not every epilepsy patient is a candidate for surgery. Since seizures come in different shapes and sizes, epilepsy is a complex problem to treat. For the 30 percent of patients whose seizures aren’t controlled by anti-epileptic medication, epilepsy surgery offers the possibility of seizure control. Procedures performed at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center include:

For a referral to a Washington University neurologist or neurosurgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, call .

Epilepsy Patient, Neurosurgeon

Clint McMurphy from Makanda, IL was diagnosed with grand mal seizures and epilepsy at the age of 3. His doctors had it under control with medication most of his life, but by the time Clint was in his upper 20s, the seizures became uncontrollable, often making him lose consciousness.

Neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt, MD, performed a focal resection, removing the tissue from Clint’s left temporal lobe that was responsible for epileptic seizures.

Learn more about Clint or see more patient stories.

 

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