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Real Science, Real Innovation: Brain Tumor


In the past, the location of a brain tumor was the deciding factor as to whether it could be treated or not. If the tumor happened to be located deep inside the brain, this left relatively few options for the patient, and often resulted in little to no hope of recovery. However, with the advances of technology in the last few years, there is new hope.

 

Barnes-Jewish Hospital specializes in treating all types of brain tumors, even those located deep within the brain. It became the second hospital in the country to offer the Monteris system, a less invasive procedure that allows treatment for tumors that were once considered untreatable. In addition to the Monteris system, researchers at Washington University created brain mapping, which decodes brain activity and networks. A game changing tool, brain networking gives vital information to the physicians which maximizes the removal of tumors and minimizes the impact on neurological functions, resulting in a higher recovery rate for the patient.

 

Another advancement is the intraoperative MRI in the operating room. The only one in the region, the high field strength of the IMRI allows for precision imaging during the surgery, allowing the physicians to pinpoint areas of the brain that would otherwise be unseen. By using the MRI, surgeries are improved by 30-40% on average.

 

These latest advances in brain tumor surgical techniques has lead Barnes-Jewish Hospital to become a leader in offering individualized, safe and effective surgical solutions to those fighting brain tumors. With over 600 brain tumor procedures performed each year, the Neuroscience Center is dedicated to providing the best care for its patients.

 

To find out more about Barnes-Jewish Hospital brain tumor surgical treatment, visit us online at Barnes Jewish or call 1-314-TOP-DOCS (314-867-3627) or toll-free 866-867-3627.

Other topics in the Real Science, Real Innovation series:
November: Lung Cancer
December: Pancreatic Cancer
January: Stroke TPA Treatment
February: Heart Attack and STEMI
March: Colon Cancer
April: Atrial Fibrillation
May: Hemorrhagic Stroke
June: Breast Cancer
July: Leukemia
August: Stroke
September: Prostate Cancer
October: Brain Tumor

 

Understanding Brain Tumors

While Senator Ted Kennedy was recently diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor, a brain tumor diagnosis isn't necessarily a death sentence. New treatments and technologies are giving patients new hope. Find out more from Dr. Ralph Dacey, chief of neurosurgery at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.

 
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