Barnes-Jewish Hospital | Washington University Physicians

CURIOSUS: The Art and Science of Medicine

ky00r-ee-OH-sus; Latin; adjective Eager to learn or know; inquisitive


STUDY LOOKS AT DUAL NICOTINE USE Tuesday, October 4, 20220

STUDY LOOKS AT DUAL NICOTINE USE

E-cigs were praised as a healthier alternative to cigarettes when they were first invented, but a study looking at dual nicotine use says otherwise.

RISKY DRIVING BEHAVIORS AND COMMON SLEEP DISORDERS Tuesday, October 4, 20220

RISKY DRIVING BEHAVIORS AND COMMON SLEEP DISORDERS

30% – 50% of older adults have mild sleep apnea: a condition that causes breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep. Some people may not have any signs or symptoms of impairment, resulting in increased risks when getting behind a steering wheel.

RECURRENT UTIS AND THE GUT MICROBIOME Tuesday, October 4, 20220

RECURRENT UTIS AND THE GUT MICROBIOME

Antibiotics do not prevent UTIs or future infections. Research shows that they actually can do the opposite by clearing healthy bacteria from the body, making it easier for E.coli to infect the bladder in a poorly diversified gut microbiome.

NEW DRUG, POSITIVE RESULTS FOR HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY Monday, October 3, 20220

NEW DRUG, POSITIVE RESULTS FOR HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy – a heart condition also known as HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people, often going undetected. Thankfully a new drug could mean a brighter future for people suffering from HCM.

A HISTORY OF HEART FAILURE—AND RECOVERY Monday, October 3, 20220

A HISTORY OF HEART FAILURE—AND RECOVERY

Heart failure is the leading cause of death in the US, but modern medical advancements are working towards drastically reducing those rates for decades to come.

COVID-19 VACCINE BOOSTERS AND SOLID ORGAN TRANSPLANTS Monday, October 3, 20220

COVID-19 VACCINE BOOSTERS AND SOLID ORGAN TRANSPLANTS

Solid organ transplant recipients are at high risk for developing severe COVID-19. The immunosuppressive medications that prevent the body from rejecting the new organ can cause the patient to be high-risk for catching all types of infectious diseases.

BRIDGING COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL GAPS Monday, October 3, 20220

BRIDGING COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL GAPS

St. Louis is home to an estimated 140,000 immigrants. BJC recognizes that it is important to meet this growing population where they are in all aspects, including language. BJC’s Language Services provides free, 24/7 access to interpreters for patients and family members.

A TWO-STEP INTERVENTION FOR LUNG CANCER Monday, October 3, 20220

A TWO-STEP INTERVENTION FOR LUNG CANCER

Quitting smoking seems like an impossible task, but the first step is understanding what you’re up against.

SPINA BIFDA: MAKING REPAIRS BEFORE BIRTH Wednesday, September 28, 20220

SPINA BIFDA: MAKING REPAIRS BEFORE BIRTH

The Barnes-Jewish Fetal Care Center is one of the only centers in the Midwest that offers prenatal surgery to treat spina bifida. Specialists have now seen positive results with an innovative, less invasive treatment called Fetoscopic surgery. With modern technology, spina bifida can be corrected before the baby is born, allowing spina bifida patients to lead happy, healthy lives.

FIERCE ADVOCACY: DENTAL CARE FOR THE UNDERSERVED Wednesday, September 28, 20220

FIERCE ADVOCACY: DENTAL CARE FOR THE UNDERSERVED

“Fierce advocacy recognizes that some people have less than others.” The High Acuity Adult Special Needs Dental Program at Barnes-Jewish Hospital has treated 20,000 patients and counting, making sure that no one slips through the cracks.

STROKE CARE AND TPA: A BACK STORY Monday, February 21, 20220

STROKE CARE AND TPA: A BACK STORY

By Andrea Mongler

It’s 1982, and a man is having a heart attack. An ambulance rushes him to the emergency department, where he’s given a nitroglycerin tablet and a drug called nifedipine.

The treatment doesn’t seem to work, and the man’s heart sustains serious damage. An emergency physician delivers the news to the man’s family: “He might not survive the night. We’ll keep him comfortable, but there’s nothing else we can do.”

For years, this scene was a common one, played out again and again in emergency departments across the nation. Physicians did their best to care for heart attack patients—but their best too often wasn’t enough. That’s because nifedipine and other drugs used at the time simply weren’t effective.

SAVING LIVES DURING THE PANDEMIC Tuesday, January 25, 20220

SAVING LIVES DURING THE PANDEMIC

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREGG GOLDMAN

In the fall of 2021, Curiosus writer and Barnes-Jewish Hospital administrative fellow Emily Dovolis Thomson, MHA, talked with Muhammad Faraz Masood, MD, Washington University cardiothoracic surgeon, and other members of a specialized team about a life-saving procedure called ECMO, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Often used to treat the sickest of the sick, ECMO sustains life when the body no longer can. During the days of the SARS-coV-2 pandemic, ECMO, which performs the functions the heart and lungs can no longer manage, has become a valuable tool in saving lives.

This photo essay suggests the level of expertise required to care for patients undergoing ECMO, an intervention with many moving parts. It takes a dedicated team to manage the complexities.

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