Barnes-Jewish Hospital | Washington University Physicians

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Interviews from the inside

MATERNAL-FETAL & NEWBORN TRANSPORT SERVICES: MOBILIZING FOR MOMS

BY CONNIE MITCHELL
PHOTOS BY GARA DYSON & GREGG GOLDMAN
Jeannie Kelly, MD, MS, and Roxane Rampersad, MD
JEANNIE KELLY, MD, MS, (LEFT) AND ROXANE RAMPERSAD, MD (RIGHT)

Jeannie Kelly, MD, MS, and Roxane Rampersad, MD, recently sat down to talk with me about the Maternal-Fetal & Newborn Transport Services, a fleet of aircraft and ambulances prepared to transport pregnant women and newborns in need of specialized care.

A service of the Women & Infants Center, a collaboration by Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University Physicians and St. Louis Children’s Hospital, the service transported more than 353 high-risk pregnant women and 367 newborns within the first 10 months of 2020 alone. Kelly is medical director of the service; Rampersad is its outreach director. Both women are Washington University maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Among the many vehicles available to rush patients to Barnes-Jewish Hospital for emergency care, six intensive-care ambulances, two twin-engine helicopters and a fixed-wing aircraft stand ready. Each is equipped and staffed to deliver patients from locations across the Midwest to the maternal-fetal care specialists they need.

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THE CANCER DOODLER

THE CANCER DOODLER

BY STEPHANIE STEMMLER
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN DIPERSIO, MD, PHD | PHOTOS BY GREGG GOLDMAN

John DiPersio, MD, PhD, is deputy director of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, and chief of the School of Medicine’s Division of Oncology. Beloved by patients, DiPersio is a highly regarded oncologist and researcher, who also is known for his interest in making art. He and his colleagues have been at the forefront of breakthroughs in cancer research, developing new drugs that have moved from the laboratory to patient care. He has led efforts to create personalized cancer immunotherapies that trigger a person’s own immune system to fight a specific type of cancer. Recently, Curiosus writer Stephanie Stemmler visited with DiPersio to talk about his research and his art.

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THE BRAIN GEEKS

THE BRAIN GEEKS

BY PAM MCGRATH
PHOTOS BY JAY FRAM

Eric Leuthardt, MD, and Albert Kim, MD, PhD, frequently engage in long talks together about the brain and the yet-to-be-solved mysteries of this complicated organ. Because both men are Washington University neurosurgeons treating patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Siteman Cancer Center, it could be assumed these conversations are a natural consequence of their mutual profession.

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COMPASSIONATE ADVOCATES FOR THE UNBORN

COMPASSIONATE ADVOCATES FOR THE UNBORN

BY PAM MCGRATH

Sarah Smith, RN, BSN, CLC, (at left, in the purple shirt) and Heather Weiler, RN, (in the colorful skirt) began their nursing careers in their 40s after working in other fields. Smith was an elementary and preschool teacher, sold real estate and worked in institutional development. Weiler held positions in physicians’ offices and worked as a medical claims processor. Both were working moms and both experienced the loss of a young child: Smith, a twin son after a difficult pregnancy; Weiler, the sudden, tragic death of a young nephew.

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HEATHER WERTIN'S WORLD OF HOPE

HEATHER WERTIN'S WORLD OF HOPE

BY PAM MCGRATH
PHOTOS BY JAY FRAM

From the time she was a nursing student in Houston, Heather Wertin, RN, BSN, MPH, now the manager of abdominal transplantation at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, was fascinated with the field of organ transplantation. Her first nursing job, at Texas Children’s Hospital, involved caring for patients before and after kidney and liver transplants. Eventually, she became the kidney transplant coordinator at that hospital.

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ART & HEALING

ART & HEALING

BY PAM MCGRATH
PHOTOS BY JAY FRAM

Ten years ago, Sarah Colby established the Arts + Healthcare program at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. With a master of fine arts degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art, her background encompassed 25 years of teaching and administrative positions at art schools, community art centers and children’s arts programs in Baltimore, New York City, Cincinnati and St. Louis. Though her experiences had prepared her for most any position dealing with the arts and people, she tackled a new set of challenges when she became part of the complex world of a large teaching hospital.

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