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Innovation

The Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Heart and Vascular Center has contributed groundbreaking research and innovative treatment of cardiovascular disease for several decades. Our physicians have historically been at the leading edge of technology. Pivotal breakthroughs include:

  • In 1987, Dr. James Cox and Dr. Michael E. Cain perfected electrical mapping of the heart and developed the Cox-Maze procedure, the gold standard in the field, to treat heart arrhythmias.
  • Ralph J. Damiano, Jr., MD, current chief of cardiothoracic surgery, developed the world-renowned Cox-Maze IV procedure in 2002, which is a minimally invasive and more successful version of the original Cox-Maze procedure.
  • In 2010, Washington University physicians were the first in the St. Louis area to execute the minimally invasive transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. They have since performed over 1,000 TAVRs, more than any other center in the region.

From clinical trials to minimally invasive treatment, our commitment to innovative heart and vascular care continues. All Washington University Physicians who practice at the Heart and Vascular Center are also teaching and researching faculty at the Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery or the Vascular Surgery program.  Research interests vary across programs and are often collaborative efforts intended to broaden our understanding of conditions, sharpen techniques for treatment and ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Current research efforts at the Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Heart and Vascular Center include, but are  not limited to:

  • Cardiovascular genetics
  • Arrhythmia treatment with robotics
  • Diabetes and heart health
  • Transplant immunology
  • Limb revascularization
  • Treating thoracic outlet syndrome in athletes

Learn more about our latest medical developments.

Call 888.969.4806 to make an appointment with a Washington University heart or vascular specialist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.